Monday, August 11, 2014

Far beyond the sun: Malmsteen with ditones (Guitar practice)

As I said many times, ditones are a state of mind. Here I'll demonstrate this taking a small fragment from the "rhythm" of Yngwie Malmsteen most famous "Far Beyond the Sun", that opens his Rising Force (1984) album.

Let's consider the last two bars before the Yngwie's presentation lick. We have a little dimineshed arpeggio (2 notes per string from D to low E) and a small scalar fragment that crashes on a power chords.

Now think ditones: the arpeggio is nothing but the tremendous 1.5 exercise in which we had 3 groups of 2 notes per string, resulting in a sextuplet (here we have two triplets). The fingers are 4 and 1.
Go back to that exercise and repeat it.

To get the Yngwie phrase, mix that with pelota (3.6), i.e. add a position shift everytime you change string. Here you obtain:

D:-6-3------------
A:------5-2-------
E:-----------4-1--

Now for the scale sequence you'll have a burst section. The notes are twice as faster (8-th triplets, no more quarter notes!) and you have something you are used to in Keelbert (ditones 134)

A:--------2-4-5-
E:-2-4-5--------

you than seal going back as follows:

D:-------------------4
A:---4-2------------4
E:--------5-4-2-1---2

Beware of the position shift between 2-1-power chords.
And remember that Yngwie's tune is a half step down (Eb).

Still worried there's no exercise here?
You can obtain a nice arpeggio version of 1.5 and pelota, extending this idea and having something musical. Go and figure it out youself and comment with the exercise below, if you wish.

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diminished arpeggio scheme